I love my parents, and my parents’ friends and all the wonderful baby boomers in my life.

But geez they annoy me as a generation.

Swanning around in million dollar properties they paid 25,000 bucks for. Earning a tax-free income in retirement. Cashing in on their free university qualifications without a HECS debt in sight.

Baby boomers account for 25% of the population but own 52% of the wealth. They built their careers and wealth over an unprecedented period of economic growth.

Did you know we’ve now had more than a hundred quarters of positive growth? This is like having a hundred consecutive days of perfect dieting with no accidental chocolate incidents – i.e. practically unheard-of. (I admit we have lived through this period too – but with a lower base of assets to grow from).

Sure they had the recession in the 90s and the 1987 stockmarket crash. They had to live through skinny jeans before lycra was invented, and they didn’t get to play Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego at school. I’m not saying their lives were perfect.

But they have done ok, and Smashed Avo-gate brought this simmering divide to the surface. It’s partly because the world has changed so quickly, so deeply. Home ownership used to be an expectation for any adult with a job and a bank account. It’s now a mythical place of $100,000 deposits, heartbreaking auctions and million-dollar median prices.

The luckiest among us will get help from our parents. Others have parents who can’t or won’t contribute, creating a further divide.

So, what can we do about it? How can we stop those greedy (but totally loved and appreciated!) baby boomers from stealing our futures?

Don’t get mad, get even. And get advice.
Investment Trends says baby boomers account for four in five dollars under advice (i.e money being looked after by financial advisers). That means they are out there getting financial advice while all of us suckers are messing around reading The Fierce Girl’s Guide to Finance. JK! That’s a great idea!

But it might not be enough. I’m not a profesh, and I can’t tell you what’s best for your circumstances.
Sure, advice isn’t free, but it is an investment. Do it early, do it right and it will pay dividends in future. It’s like the difference between messing around at the gym on your own and losing half a kilo in six months, or getting a PT and dropping 5kg in six weeks.

And just like paying a PT makes you really think twice about eating that piece of cake (because hey, you just dropped 80 bucks on a workout), getting a financial plan can make you much more focused and disciplined. If you want to find a good one, my homegirl Nicole P-M has a good column about this.

If you still don’t want to stump up for the full box and dice, you could look at a digital option – aka Robo-advice. Decimal and Stockspot are some of the bigger players (but I haven’t used them so can’t provide a recommendation).

Take Baby Boomer advice with a very big grain of salt. The stuff our parents did to get ahead was done in a different world. Back in the 80s you could get 15% interest for sticking money in the bank. Inflation could be up to 10% as well, but worst case scenario, that’s still a 5% gain.

The best you can hope for today is a 3% interest rate if you shop around. Inflation has been hovering around 2%. So, that’s a big old 1% gain for stashing your money in a bank. (Don’t understand the inflation thing? Check out this post).


Before 2008, the world hadn’t heard of quantitative easing (i.e. governments printing money) or negative interest rates (an actual thing). Now, bank deposits barely keep up with anaemic inflation rates (and in countries like Switzerland you have to pay the bank to look after your money, thanks to negative interest rates. I shit you not).

Buying property was a stretch, but a sure bet for building wealth. You could probably even do it on one income. Today, a mortgage that’s 6 or 8 times the average income means you both work and possibly pay for childcare too. And the stockmarket generally doesn’t deliver the double-digit returns it did back then.

The finance industry calls this a ‘low growth, low return’ world.
So hey, thanks boomers for setting that up!

I’m sorry that have no good news for you on this front. It’s going to be like this for a while yet.
What it does mean is that taking advice from your folks can be tricky. They’re in a different headspace (in retirement or close to it) and need to focus on protecting their nest egg.


But we don’t.


There’s a concept called ‘pushing up the risk curve’ – it means that you take on more risk in order to chase higher returns. Instead of buying bluechip stocks you buy cheaper, more speculative ones. Instead of investment grade bonds you buy unrated ones. Instead of buying fixed interest bonds, you buy shares with high dividends.


Remember when you first start drinking alcohol and it took you two Bacardi Breezers to get hammered? But as you increase your ‘piss fitness’ you need a whole six pack and some shots to get to ‘hilarious drunk shenanigans’ level.

Similarly, we need to take more risk in this environment to get the same returns as before.


I am NOT saying go to Vegas and put it all on black. I am NOT saying attend a property spruiker seminar that promises you vast riches if you sign up RIGHT NOW, TONIGHT ONLY!

What I am saying is that we may need to look at something more aggressive than a bank account. Buying bank shares because your dad says they’re good? Maybe not. Buying an investment property because your parents made a killing on a Gold Coast apartment circa 1994? Maybe think twice.

The good thing is, we are young. We can tolerate more risk. If we go backwards we have many more years to go forward.

So just make sure you run any well-meaning advice through a filter, the same as you would when your mum gave you fashion advice as a teenager. (On second thoughts, my mum probably had some useful insights then). 

And short of just asking your folks to stump up funds for a house deposit, I don’t have a lot more advice than this: save more, spend less. That’s what a lot of our parents did. My family ate at the Yarrawarrah Windmill Chinese Restaurant once in a while, but that was the eating out budget. They didn’t get a new iPhone every two years. We had the world’s shittiest cars (Subaru Enduro – wtf). They never took to us to Disneyland. And that’s how my parents ended up paying off the house.

So, take the best bits of the boomers, ignore all the cushy tax breaks they’ve made for themselves, and crack on with you own money goals.