There is one important things that bad-arse, grown-up ladies do with their money.

And no, it’s not buy designer handbags.

Ok  maybe some do – but that’s not what this post is about.

No, what really grown-up ladies do is invest their money. Don’t be put off by that word ‘invest’.

You don’t need a finance degree to invest.

You can get someone to do it for you if you like.

Just like you don’t need to be a colourist to get your hair coloured, you don’t need to be a finance expert to invest.

You may want the guidance or input of a financial adviser. But you can also get a feel for it by starting small and being smart.

What sort of investments?

Well there are lots of ‘asset classes’, but the most popular ones in Australia are shares, property and cash. They all have different pros and cons, so I like to explain them like a shoe wardrobe.

Cash: your work flats – Not very exciting, and not much benefit to your outfit, but geez they are comfy and reliable. Especially if you have to hike to a meeting at the other end of town.

Similarly, putting cash in the bank has a low return, but you know you’ll get all of it back at any time.

Now, I don’t believe you should go to important meetings in flats. And so with cash, it’s fine for some purposes, but it’s not an ideal long-term play because of two reasons:

1) Opportunity cost – the longer you have it in the bank getting stuff-all interest, the more you miss out on the sweet gainz you could be getting in something like shares or property. There is also no way to reduce the tax you pay on any interest, so you pay your marginal rate (i.e the same as your income tax).

2) Inflation risk – as inflation rises, the buying power of your money decreases. If you are getting 2% in the bank, and inflation is 2.5%, then you effectively lose money, because it’s worth less than before.  (I have a whole post on this if you’re interested – here)

Now, if you’re really committed to cash because you’re risk averse or don’t quite know when you’ll want your money back, there is a subset of cash called Enhanced Cash (or similar names).

It tends to give you a couple of percentage points higher than a bank deposit, but is still pretty safe. Think of it as a strappy summer flat – a bit more pizzazz but no real risk of limping home in bare feet, with the balls of your feet burning.

One example is Smarter Money Investments, which I name here because I know the guy who runs it – he is a massive nerd and gets great returns (and for full disclosure, my employer owns some of it). There are other products out there which you could consider from a range of fund managers.

These products aren’t exactly the same as putting cash in the bank, but they are low on the risk spectrum. Make sure you read the fine print.

PropertyYour winter boots – If your boot wardrobe is anything like mine (extensive and carefully curated) then you’d know there are hits and misses. I have faves that have done the hard yards and been a damn great buy.

One of my fave buys

Then there are ones like the blue velvet over-the-knee pair. They were on sale, I had to own them, but now I can’t find anything to wear with them. In investing, this is called ‘poor asset selection’.

Buying investment property is really dependent on how well you choose. Unlike the velvet boot purchase, your property choice should be carefully researched, highly rational and based on solid data sources.

Despite what people say, not all property goes up in value, all the time. It is true that property has been the best-performing asset class in the last couple of decades, but that is an average.

Some locations or house types languish, or even go down. So while property can be a great way to build wealth, it needs more than a good knowledge of colour swatches and Ikea assembly.

The latest Russell Investments report looking at historical returns, warns that even though residential property is the best performer on average, “there was wide variation between regions, dwelling types and suburbs, with some areas declining”.

This is a risk of single-asset investing – imagine if every time you went out, all you had were those blue velvet boots!

So, just be really well-prepared if you go down this road.  And if you don’t want to go it alone, you have a couple of choices.

  1. Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs) – these are a collection of properties parcelled together, and you  buy ‘units’ of them on the ASX, a bit like you buy shares. The value of the units can go up and down depending on the market (and  don’t always reflect what’s happening in the rest of the property sector. They got hammered in the GFC, for example).

    However, they give you a different flavour to traditional shares (aka equities) and the cost of entry is lower than stumping up for a house or apartment. They also give you access to more than just residential property – so you can own offices, warehouses and other commercial buildings. This provides diversification.

  2. Work with a professional property adviser – Someone like Anna Porter, who is a Fierce Girl-style powerhouse, if you ever get to see her speak. Her company does all the research and then advises on which property to buy. There are lots of similar advisers out there – but make sure they are independent and not just trying to spruik an overpriced new development.

 

Overall, Aussies love property investment and aren’t going to stop any time soon.

But I will just say this: don’t assume that just because you live in a house, you know how to invest in one.

It requires skill, knowledge and yes – luck – to get right.

Shares – your fancy, going-out-to-dinner heels. They give you great rewards (you feel so sexy) but they also have more risks – from tripping over, through to searing pain in your foot.

Shares have historically given great returns. (Nice chart on that here). But they do it with more volatility.

If you happen to put money in just before some stock market craziness, then, yeah you’ll lose some of it quicker than a Bachelor contestant loses her shit at a rose ceremony.

But, just like the resilient young ladies of The Bachelor, you’ll get back up and repair your losses over time. You need time and patience though – if you lack either of those, you could turn the ‘on paper’ loss into a real loss.

That said, there is a lot to like about shares. Not only are they strong performers in terms of returns, they are liquid (i.e. you can usually sell them way faster than a house). You can buy just a few and pay nothing more than a brokerage fee for the privilege, whereas property needs a big upfront investment and has quite a few of costs, from stamp duty through to legal fees.

I’ve written more about shares in this delightfully named piece: Buying shares is pretty much like choosing a husband.

Which investment has the best returns?

You know I’m not going to give you an easy answer.

The thing to remember with any investment is that when people (i.e. the media, finance types, blokes in pubs) talk about returns, they are often talking about that whole asset class.

The Russell Investments report shows that:

Australian shares returned 4.3%, before tax, in the ten years to Dec 2016. But that’s the market average. You may have bought some shares that went bananas and made 20%. Or you bought some that tanked and you barely broke even.

Ideally, neither of these things happened, because you had a diverse portfolio  where the winners and losers balance each other out.

You can do this by investing in managed funds, listed investment companies or exchange-traded funds. (More on that here).

Residential property returned 8.1%, before tax, in the 10 years to Dec 2016. Yeah, almost double the return of shares. But that’s a helicopter view. There are people who made way more than that because they picked a lucky location; then some people in places like Perth and Mackay who watched their properties fall 20% or more in value.

There are also more asset classes than what’s discussed here (alternatives, international shares, fixed income etc). I have just focused on the most popular.

Then there is tax. And it’s complicated.

Broadly speaking, property investing can be good for people who have a high tax bill, as they can declare a loss and claim it as a tax deduction (the oft-discussed ‘negative gearing’).

And for people who pay low or no income tax, Aussie shares can be great because of dividend imputation (aka franking credits). Now I won’t explain these, because working them out literally made me cry in my finance degree. But the outcome is, the less tax you pay, the more you get a bonus return on top. (If you’re interested, I co-wrote this article on the topic).

Of course, you should discuss these tax-type things with an accountant or financial adviser. My main point is that looking at a headline return isn’t very accurate – it depends on your costs, tax rate and timing.

You can start small

Despite all these caveats and warnings, the message I want to give you is this: investing is a key part of building wealth (remember the Four Best Friends Who Will Make You Rich?). Letting your cash sit in the bank forever or spending it whenever you get it, won’t get you closer to your ideal lifestyle.

The more you learn about it now, and the earlier you start, the more you could make over time.

Don’t be afraid to start small. I’ve been running a little portfolio on Acorns, and it’s doing well. Even popping $500 into a managed fund or listed investment company can be a good start.

That’s the key though: you need to start somewhere.

And if all this seems like a lot of information, that’s fine too. It’s totally ok to ask for help. Talk to an adviser, or a trusted friend or family member. You don’t have to be an expert to be an investor.

Photo credits:
M.P.N.texan Good Shoes via photopin (license)
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