Did you know that 2 in 5 Australian women don’t feel in control of their financial situation?

That’s according to an MLC survey of women, which also found that of the 43 per cent who do not feel in control, 61 per cent said low savings is the main factor.

While concerning, it’s not really surprising. But I’m not here to give you a lecture and say ‘girlfriends, think positively!’.

[NB: Feminist rant alert!]

You see, it’s not as simple as changing our attitude or outlook. We are not just struggling with our money; we are struggling with the patriarchy.

We are conditioned from a young age to think of money as something that buys us stuff. The kind of stuff that helps us win in the world of constructed femininity – first dolls, then clothes, then make-up, then diets, then surgery and then all of that shit that we convince ourselves we need. (Or society tells us we need).

I am guilty of this  – I got suckered into the Priceline 50% off sale last week too.

But before I beat myself up about it, I think about the forces at work. I’m nearly 40, single and work in a male-dominated industry. My appearance is part of my currency, for good or bad. I need that make-up, I need to cover that grey hair, or so my internalised misogyny tells me.

(OK, so, my boss hasn’t told me I need 10 shades of glitter eyeshadow – that is some creative licence from me).

The weight of it all

I am not suggesting we stop shaving or go bare-faced (unless we want to, of course). But when we look at how the beauty-industrial-complex sucks our money and attention away from us, we should have pause for thought.

Have you ever added up how much you spend on this stuff every year? I haven’t. On purpose – far too scary.

But even a vague mental checklist of hairdresser, make-up, fake tan and hair products is alarming. Add in all the clothes and accessories I buy, and it gets scarier.

And that’s me being a tight-arse, not buying anything full-price, having a low-maintenance hairdo, and refusing to get my nails done (oh how I miss thee, Shellac).

If I think of the women in my life, we all have those kinds of expenses. And it seems to be getting harder, with Instagram beauty demanding all sorts of high-maintenance appearances, including botox, fillers and surgery.

Now I’m not saying these things alone account for any money troubles we have. But there are two things to note:

  1. Men don’t have these costs.
  2. We are highly distracted by them.

Being chained to the costs and worries of our personal appearance, our body fat levels or our emerging wrinkles – this chips away at our sense of confidence, not to mention our bank balances.

What’s the solution? 

Being ‘woke’, as the young folk say these days.

In other words, being conscious of the impact the patriarchy has on us and our confidence.

Being alive to the impact of our socialisation as young girls, where money was rarely on the agenda but being pretty was.

We don’t have to burn our bras (that would be both toxic and wasteful). But we can rebel in our own ways.

  • We can take on the knowledge that has traditionally been the domain of men – finances, investment, capital.
  • We can create boundaries for our spending, so that we do the sensible stuff – like saving and paying off debt – before we rock up to David Jones.
  • We can make a plan, set goals, educate ourselves and take on financial planning with the same enthusiasm as we take on a Kayla Itsines bikini body challenge.

Knowledge, attention, action. Pretty much the key ingredients to any great social change. And remember: