One of the things we all struggle with is finding the right motivation to do things better.

Making good decisions with your money is hard.

There are so many fun things to spend it on. The Wittner sale! A Shellac manicure! A new handbag! All nice things, I’ll agree. (And all things I have been known to ‘invest’ in).

But if we are to build true wealth, we can’t just buy nice things.

We need to think about the kind of life we’re building. What we want to do, how we want to live, what we want to achieve.

Because money shouldn’t be about what you can own; it should be about what you can do.

A big part of this is what I call ‘Mindful Spending’ – which you can read more about here. But you can also go bigger with your thinking.

What’s your legacy?

I started a new job a couple of months ago, and my first pay was not only more than a month’s worth, it included a nice payrise. I gave myself a month to go a little nuts with it. I called it the ‘month of spending’.

One of the greatest enjoyments I had was taking out people I love and picking up the cheque.

Then I made a ridiculously large order at Dan Murphy’s so that my cocktail cabinet is ready for guests who enjoy Martinis, Old-fashioned’s or Negronis. (I may be partial to those myself, from time to time).

In general, I’ve set up my place with a comfy lounge, a fancy air mattress and good pillows, so that all my friends and family can come stay in the city when they want to. Do I encourage/enable them to go out and have big nights in Surry Hills? Possibly.

Anyway, I’m not telling you this to make you think I’m a good person, or to make you come over to my place (but hey, you’re totally welcome). The point is that money is making me happy, by making other people happy.

If I thought about what I would like to be remembered for one day, I don’t want people to say ‘Belinda had a great collection of boots’ (although, admittedly, I do).

I want them to say ‘Bo was always up for an impromptu cocktail party at her place’. Or maybe, ‘Remember that time she danced on the stage at Arq/in the cage at Stonewall/on the podium at Carmen’s’. (Admittedly, that last one was circa 1998).

So maybe this is a really long way of saying that making memories is just as important as making money.

Finding your why

I understand that not everyone wants to be remembered for their willingness to dance in public. But I’m sure you have an idea of how you want to impact other people’s lives.

I’m not advocating that you spend on other people before yourself. Like the oxygen masks on the plane, fix your own financial situation before anyone else’s. But do with an eye for how it impacts others.

Here are some questions you might ask yourself, when you’re trying to get serious about not wasting money:

  • How does my spending affect other people around me, either positively or negatively?
  • Do my current spending choices make feel good? How good? What would make them feel even better?
  • Am I setting myself up for positive opportunities down the track? Or is my spending focused on short-term sugar hits?

Sometimes, it’s good to take a step back and think about the bigger picture.

And hopefully, it will be one more motivator to make good decisions with your money.